A life

Greetings to everyone who reads this short article, which describes some of the life experiences underpinning the prayers I post each day on this website.

I was born in the UK, soon after the end of the Second World War, and was the youngest of 3 children. My mother was unpredictable, given to destructive outbursts of rage, emotionally abusive and controlling. Throughout my childhood and teenage years I lived with constant anxiety and fear, and had very little sense of who I was.

When I left home to go to university, I was ill-prepared to cope with independence. I began having panic attacks, though at the time I had no idea what they were. At the beginning of the third year I had a breakdown, abandoned my studies, and returned home. 

After a period of unemployment, I worked in an office, then in a day centre, where I helped to care for people with physical and learning disabilities. One day a client accidentally set fire to the cushion of his wheelchair with a dropped cigarette. In lifting him up, I tore a tendon in my back, leaving me in constant pain.

The only treatment for back pain in those days was bed-rest. After about 18 months of this, I decided to try walking to the shops. Just a short distance from home I had a major panic attack. Although I didn’t understand this at the time, I had become agoraphobic. As with all phobias, the more I tried to avoid my fears, the worse they became.

Despite my constant pack pain and mental illness, my partner and I got married, and I became pregnant. When I went into labour, serious complications necessitated an emergency admission to hospital. The whole experience was traumatic. Afterwards, I developed multiple phobias, and found it hard to cope with the normal stresses of caring for my baby. 

A year later I became pregnant again, but had a miscarriage at about fifteen weeks, leading to emergency surgery. Afterwards, I developed severe anxiety and depression, so my toddler had to go into daycare. 

At this point, I learned that I was agoraphobic. From the local library, I borrowed a copy of “Agoraphobia – simple effective treatment”, by Claire Weekes. Slowly, I began to fight back, despite my mental and physical fragility.

There were further breakdowns along the way, and endless struggles with depression, anxiety, panic and dread. When my son was about seven, I began studying for a degree in psychology, but this time only managed the first year, before the panic attacks became so intense that I was forced to give up.

Along the way, though this seems astonishing as I look back, I did my best to contribute to my family’s finances whenever I was well enough. Without any qualifications, I did the best I could with the skills I had picked up earlier in my life. Over the years I worked as a student landlady, cleaner, and barmaid. I organised children’s parties, ran a dance band, and taught music informally.

Later, I joined a five-piece band, travelling to gigs all around the UK. I quickly learned never to mention my fears, and somehow got through. It was hard, but I did the best I could to have a life. I suppose I unconsciously assumed it was the same for everyone.

Throughout this time, I read all I could about anxiety, depression, panic disorders and the factors underpinning them. I made daily efforts to face my fears in a graded way, building up my tolerance until I could walk to the centre of my home-town, visit a supermarket, and drive a few miles alone.

Realising I would never be able to cope with the stresses of full-time study, I began attending an adult education centre. Slowly, over a period of seven years, I  worked to gain a certificate in counselling, an advanced certificate, then a diploma. During this time I also entered therapy, worked as a volunteer counsellor, and tried to gain insight until the origins of my mental issues. Meanwhile, I continued to push against my boundaries by starting to travel on trains. Essentially, I managed to live with my fears through dogged efforts to confront them.

Once qualified, I began work in the National Health Service as a counsellor, later beginning a part-time master’s degree. My academic results were good, but the stress of achieving them was very high. 

Unfortunately, half-way through the two-year course, I developed Grave’s Disease. Too ill to work, and deteriorating rapidly, I had emergency surgery to remove my thyroid. It took me a year to recover enough to go back to work, and to continue my degree, but somehow I managed it, even coming top in my year-group. However, the illness left me dependent on medication for the rest of my life, and with the collateral damage of daily headaches and frequent migraines.

The migraines eventually made work impossible, so I retired. Not long afterwards, a bout of influenza left me with chronic fatigue (M.E.). For the first few years, I was unable to walk more than a few paces around the house, and relied on a mobility scooter. Eventually, I learned about pacing as a possible way forwards. It took me a year of building up through slow, daily practice to be able to walk about five hundred yards up a gentle slope. Despite this improvement, I have lived with chronic fatigue ever since. The limitations it imposes have increased with each illness, and as I’ve got older.

Unable to make music  any more, I slowly developed other methods of creative expression, including textile art, writing, and editing. In 2013 I began a website (www.ruthkirk.org), and have posted a daily, original, spiritual poem there ever since. I also enjoyed helping in a charity shop for a few hours each week until three and a half years ago, when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. This was swiftly followed by a mastectomy, then by lengthy attempts to cope with various drugs, whose side effects eventually proved intolerable. This time, the collateral damage was losing the ability to regulate my temperature, so I now cycle constantly between sweating and shivering, day and night. There is no treatment for this condition, which doesn’t even seem to have a name, though it has a significant impact on my quality of life. 

Nowadays, my limited energy is spent on hospital appointments, occasional short walks, and a few social contacts. Church is too hard to manage, but I have made a shrine in my bedroom, which I find very helpful.

As I slowly become more accepting of my overall condition, my faith grows ever stronger. When I was confirmed, very recently, I took the name of Sainte Thérèse de Lisieux. Her “little way” of doing everything, however small, with love, has become my daily aim. Accordingly, I would like to finish this article with a prayer I wrote some years ago. Each morning, I say it soon after waking up:

Your little way 

Thank you, Lord,
For this new day.
Please keep me
On your little way,

Then I will feel, think,
Say, and do
Everything with love,
For you.

No matter what
You give or take,
May I accept it
For your sake,

And strive to feel, think,
Say, and do
Everything with love –
Like you.

To those who have read this brief summary of my life-story, I send my thanks, praying that one day it will help someone, somewhere. May God bless you all.

✝️ Ruth Kirk (22.2.22.)


 

You know (for P.)

He knows how weak we are;
he remembers we are only dust.
(Psalm 103:14-16; NLT).

Lord,
You know how weak I am:
Please heal my body
Day by day.

Lord,
You know how low I am:
Please heal my mind,
So I can pray.

Lord,
You know how tired I am:
Please heal my heart,
My inmost core.

Lord,
You know how faint I am:
Please heal my soul,
Then I will soar.

🖤

Those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.
(Isaiah 40:31; NIV).

 


Unhurried and unworried

To enjoy your work and accept your lot in life –
this is indeed a gift from God
(Ecclesiastes 5:19; NLT).

1. I can do a lot
If I’m unhurried.

2. I can walk, Lord,
If I take my time.

3. I can still write prayers –
If I work slowly,

4. Searching out each rhythm,
Word, and rhyme.

5. I can do a lot
If I’m unworried,

6. Accepting how I am, Lord,
All day long;

7. Living in your presence,
And rejoicing –

8. For though I’m weak, and tired,
You are strong.


References

1. I walk slowly all my years (Isaiah 38:15; ESV).

3. Do not worry about your life, what you will eat; or about your body, what you will wear. For life is more than food, and the body more than clothes […] Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to your life? Since you cannot do this very little thing, why do you worry about the rest? (Luke 12:22-26; NIV).

5. The Lord gave me what I had, and the Lord has taken it away. Praise the name of the Lord (Job 1:21; NLT).

Here on earth you will have many trials and sorrows (John 16:33; NLT).

6. Should we accept only good from the hand of God, and never anything bad? (Job 2:10; NLT).

I said to myself, “This is my sickness, and I must endure it” (Jeremiah 10:19; NIV).

7. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in them (1 John 4:16; NIV).

His name is the Lord – rejoice in his presence! (Psalm 68:4; NLT).

8. He knows how weak we are (Psalm 103:14; NLT).

I am weary and worn out, O God (Proverbs 30:1; NLT).

Recognise that the Lord is glorious and strong (1 Chronicles 16:28; NLT).

Weakness


Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted there.
(Matthew 4:1; NLT).

1. Son of Man,
You recollect our weakness:
Our tiredness, our frailty,
Our tears.

2. Son of Man,
You recognise our weakness:
Our stubbornness, our lack of faith,
Our fears.

3. Son of Man,
You understand our weakness:
Our selfishness, our ignorance,
Our sin.

4. Son of Man,
You fully grasp our weakness:
For you shared all the tests
We face within.

References

1. He knows how weak we are; he remembers we are only dust (Psalm 103:14; NLT).

2. He rebuked them for their lack of faith and their stubborn refusal to believe those who had seen him after he had risen (Mark 16:14; NIV).

3. Before a word is on my tongue you, Lord, know it completely (Psalm 139:4; NIV).

You, Lord, know my folly; my guilt is not hidden from you (Psalm 69:5; NIV).

4. This High Priest of ours understands our weaknesses, for he faced all of the same testings we do, yet he did not sin (Hebrews 4:15; NLT).

In all their suffering he also suffered (Isaiah 63:9; NLT).